The Bass Digital Education Fellows program welcomed its inaugural cohort of graduate student fellows during the 2019-2020 academic year. This program grew out of the Bass Online Apprenticeship fellowship, which ran from 2014 until 2019.

2020-2021 Bass Digital Education Fellows

Bejjani headshotChristina Bejjani, who graduated with her PhD in Psychology and Neuroscience from Duke University, crafted her Bass project to address research needs in the social sciences at Duke. “Introductory Programming for Online Social Science Experiments” is an online, in-depth, and self-paced course on using crowdsourced populations for online experiments (ethics, basic details, pitfalls and benefits) and acquiring programming skills for presenting stimuli and collecting responses using JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and Qualtrics. During Fall 2020, the fellow developed this course on Github so that the materials were open-source and students could become collaborators in the learning process. During Spring 2021, these four Modules on Github began to be developed into a Coursera course, intended for piloting with Duke undergraduate students.
davenport headshotEmma Davenport, a PhD candidate in English, partnered with Professor Kathy Psomiades to design and implement a student podcast project. The aim of the Podcast Pedagogy toolkit project is to provide a kit of materials that enables faculty across a range of disciplines to teach and assess a podcast unit. The project’s output consists of a downloadable “Podcast Module Kit” that packages all essential materials for implementing a podcast design unit, including faculty instruction, assignment materials, directions for students, rubrics and other assessment options, and sample student podcasts. An associated website introduces the materials, offers those materials for download, and reflects on the project. The unit was piloted in a Spring 2021 course, English 490S-10: “Self-Help Narratives,” an advanced Special Topics course designed to fulfill the Criticism/Theory/Methodology requirement of the undergraduate English major.
anderson headshotAnderson Hagler,  a PhD candidate in History, worked on a variety of projects related to online education, particularly in relation to asynchronous communication. In addition to working directly with a history course in Fall 2020 as a consultant, two of Hagler’s major projects during his time as a Digital Education Fellow dealt with running training and producing materials for online education: graduate student training through the Online Teaching Assistant Skills Training series and the Graduate Academy course “Online Teaching" and examining the tool VoiceThread. As part of his examination of VoiceThread, Hagler spoke to instructors and staff across Duke in multiple disciplines to help put together teaching materials around the digital education tool. This culminated in a video that will guide instructors on the numerous uses of the tool for courses.
Dayton Kinney headshotDayton Kinney, a PhD candidate in Music Composition, focused her efforts as a fellow on teaching assistant training. The digital transition and move to online teaching has necessitated a growing need for the preparation and development of Duke teaching assistants (TAs). TAs need both pedagogical training and training on digital tools to advance teaching excellence and provide an inclusive pedagogical approach to teaching. In collaboration with the Graduate School, Duke faculty, and Learning Innovation consultants, the project’s primary focus was the collaborative development and implementation of workshops, academies and resources for Duke University teaching assistants.  The impact is far reaching for the Duke University community for both undergraduates and instructors, by further preparing TAs and student IORs for their specific instructional needs, which directly impacts Duke undergraduate education.  
Qingran Li headshotQingran Li, who graduated with her PhD in Environmental Policy (Economics) from Duke University worked with the spring 2021 course called “Climate Change Economics and Policy” (ENVIRON.640 / PUBPOL.585). The course was taught in a hybrid format with enrollment from Duke students from Durham as well as Duke Kunshan University (DKU). To deal with the challenge of teaching interdisciplinary materials to a diverse audience, components of the course were digitized to facilitate learning. Digitized outputs from this project include a bootcamp module that introduces students to basic concepts and tools for starting this course and asynchronous short videos and tutorials along with in-class lectures. Digital outputs of this project were made accessible to the broader Duke community via a new Sakai site.
Tatiana Lluent, who graduated with her PhD in Business Administration from Duke University, worked with Duke Innovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E) to develop an Entrepreneurship Resource Library that would bring together resources for students and instructors interested in launching a venture. The project supported by the Bass Digital Education Fellowship is part of this larger Entrepreneurship Resource Library and consists of creating a series of videos on core concepts pertaining to entrepreneurship. The videos feature a diverse set of instructors from the I&E community.

2019-2020 Bass Digital Education Fellows

Brad Boswell

Brad Boswell is a PhD candidate in Early Christianity in the Duke Graduate Program in Religion. As a Bass Digital Education Fellow, he gained broad exposure to the range of available digital tools while also learning how to navigate the benefits and challenges of these tools, leveraging the benefits for pedagogical gain. Boswell worked with Martin Eisner, PhD, Associate Professor of Romance Studies, and focused on a Dante-related project with particular emphasis on digital scholarship and pedagogy to impact undergraduate education at Duke.

Katya Gorecki headshotKatya Gorecki holds a PhD in English. Her project included developing a series of game design workshops for the Duke Games and Culture Lab. This project also involved leading the Global Game Jam, with the Duke Game Lab as one of the hosting sites (Jan. 31 – Feb. 2. 2020). Her project was led by Shai Ginsberg, PhD, Associate Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies.
Holt headshotJonathan Holt is a PhD candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering. He partnered with the Online Duke team and worked with Michael Gustafson, PhD, Associate Professor of the Practice of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He designed a “level-up” course on computational methods, intended as co-curricular support for undergraduates taking courses in engineering, computer science and math.
Hannah Rogers holds a PhD in English and worked with Tsitsi Jaji, PhD, Associate Professor of English. She worked with students to help them develop public-facing digital humanities projects. These collaborative student groups developed projects on sound and critical race studies. With this fellowship, Rogers had an opportunity to create a framework for how to design courses that integrate digital humanities project into the course curriculum.

Filippo Screpanti headshotFilippo Screpanti holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies. His digital humanities project was led by Alicia Jiménez, PhD, Assistant Professor in Classical Studies. The project was part of an undergraduate seminar in Archaeology and Visual and Media Studies titled “Roman Spectacle.” Screpanti developed a digital geo-chronological platform for displaying the monuments that were linked to spectacles in ancient Rome, to enable students to create a digital storytelling project using digital and visual mapping.

Edgar ViguezEdgar Virguez Rodriguez is a PhD candidate in Environment. He worked with Deb Reisinger, PhD, Associate Professor of the Practice of Romance Studies, on a teaching innovation project to integrate digital technologies and increase student engagement for Voices of the Environment, a course with Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum (and taught in Spanish). He developed digital assignments to increase the participation of the course’s service-learning partner, Fundacion Ayuda por Colombia, and designed course activities and videos that promote its development under the program.

2019-2020 Learning Innovation Digital Education Fellow

Donahue headshot Evan Donahue, a PhD candidate in Computational Media, Arts & Cultures, worked on a Coursera project during his time as a fellow. This fellowship placed a PhD student with Coursera’s Teaching & Learning team, providing the fellow an opportunity to work with a global learning partner, under the guidance of Learning Innovation. Read more about Evan Donahue’s fellowship in this blog post.