“My students know more about technology than I do,” is a common statement made by educators. But is it really true? They may have more apps than their professors on their phones, but it’s not …

Are you an instructor looking for teaching strategies to create an engaging learning experience for your students?  Lok Chan, Bass online apprentice with the Center for Instructional Technology (CIT) explored ways to make online discussions …

Recently, I attended the Lilly Conference on Designing Effective Teaching in Asheville, NC.  Dr. Richard Straw, Professor of History at Redford University, demonstrated a PechaKucha and discuss how he uses them assignments in his class. …

CIT has authored a number of quick-reference guides to provide Duke faculty with resources on a range of teaching strategies. As the spring term begins, we hope you will review these short guides and will find them …

“I ask students to post a photograph of themselves and record their commentary over that image (a common practice in digital presentations of oral histories).” Ashley Rose Young, Ph.D. Candidate in History, affiliated with the …

“For intermediate Hindi students, I use VoiceThread to tell a story. I show students a picture and one person starts the story and then they take turns adding events to create a full story. This is a very good way to practice speaking.” Kusum Knapczyk, Ph.D

“The goal of the project is to create a “one stop” Sakai site that allows students to both engage in self-paced research skills training, and to share the results of this training with others in their class in a media-rich way online.” – Adela Deanova

Professor Daniel Egger creates a new blended model for teaching and learning for his on-campus and distance education students and “flips” his class using the Coursera Groups feature.

In the CIT, we’re often asked by faculty what they can do to encourage students to take risks and understand the value of failure.  How do you use what’s been called “the educational power of …

Small seminar classes, by their nature, are active – the small class size and discussions necessitate participation and concentration by everyone in the room.  There are times, however, when the class may become unfocused or …