Five Podcasts to Develop Your Teaching Practices

Podcast image by Tumisu from Pixabay

Podcasts have become a commonplace medium that we integrate into our entertainment and learning — perhaps they have even made their way onto your syllabus. But did you know there are podcasts dedicated to teaching and learning development? This list of podcasts can help you in your pedagogical development, no matter what your particular interests, discipline or questions.

Teaching in Higher Ed

Teaching in Higher Ed: With over 350 episodes, the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast tackled a diverse slate of its issues during its nearly seven-year run: digital pedagogy, student evaluations, discipline-specific conversations such as equity in STEM, assessments and more. Host Bonni Stachowiak, Dean of Teaching and Learning at Vanguard University of Southern California, has welcomed an impressive tally of guests who work in higher education. Teaching in Higher Ed’s website allows you to easily sort episodes by topic and guest. Each episode includes further resources and a transcript. 

Some episodes to get started:

ThinkUDL

ThinkUDL Podcast: Are you interested in furthering your knowledge of Universal Design for Learning? The podcast is hosted by Lillian Nave who holds the positions of Senior Lecturer in First-Year Seminar and the Universal Design for Learning Coordinator and VITAL Faculty Coordinator at the Center for Academic Excellence at Appalachian State University. Every episode, Nave welcomes a new guest to discuss a different topic in relation to Universal Design for Learning principles. Episodes tend to range from about 40 minutes to little over an hour, and the ThinkUDL website has transcripts and show notes with extra resources for episodes. 

Some episodes to get started:

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning

Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning: Hosted by Columbia University’s Center for Teaching Executive Director Catherine Ross, Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning takes its inspiration from Professor of Sociology at Augsburg University — and first guest of the series — Diane Pike’s article “The Tyranny of Dead Ideas in Teaching and Learning.” The series works to debunk teaching myths that continue to shape our ideas about teaching and learning, as well as offer alternative ways of thinking. Each episode features show notes with further resources as well as a transcript. 

Some episodes to get started:

Faculty Focus Live Podcast

Faculty Focus Live Podcast: The new Faculty Focus Live Podcast focuses on a new topic on the art of teaching each episode, including Classroom Assessment Techniques, Online Discussion Boards and Trauma-Informed Pedagogy. Episode length ranges from 10-20 minutes, providing short nuggets of inspiration for instructors. Each episode includes links to further resources, as well as a transcript. If you’re looking for a podcast that acts as an introduction to multiple teaching and learning topics, Faculty Focus Live could be a good fit. The six episodes currently released can be listened to in any order. 

Centering the Margins

Centering the Margins: Beginning its run in late 2020, the Centering the Margins podcast acts as a companion to the book How To Teach Contentious Issues: A Practical Guidebook for Educators, written by Franscio Ramos, Assistant Dean for Assessment and Evaluation for the Duke Graduate School. Ramos and co-host Michael Betts II hold a conversation in each installment that supplements the topics of the guidebook. Most episodes run between 60 and 90 minutes, allowing for deep, meaningful conversation. Currently sitting at nine episodes, Centering the Margins can be digested by listening to all episodes consecutively or by choosing an episode by topic.

Need Course Help?

If you find ideas you’re interested in implementing in your own course design and would like to discuss them, please contact us at learninginnovation@duke.edu or visit us in open office hours every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from 1-3 p.m. EDT at duke.zoom.us/my/dukelearninginnovation.