Active Learning Fellows Complete Summer Roundtables

Active Learning Fellows participating in session

This year, Duke Learning Innovation teaching consultants are working closely with our 2019 Active Learning Fellows, a group of 14 faculty from various disciplines around the university. In May, the group completed a kick-off week where they learned about basic active learning classroom methods and techniques and how they relate to course design and assessment.

This summer, the group choose topics they wanted to explore further in a series of Summer Roundtables, covering advanced practical teaching topics. (These workshops —and others—can be staged for Duke faculty departments and groups by Duke Learning Innovation consultants. Contact us to arrange a session or for more information.)

Inclusiveness and Equity in the Classroom

In this session, participants identified challenges for students with marginalized identities, explored stereotype threat and ways to reduce stereotype threat in their own courses,, and examined strategies to improve the classroom climate for students with marginalized identities.

Student Centered Syllabus Design

Participants in this session explored several active learning techniques suitable for large classes, how to modify activities to successfully use them in large classes,, and looked at examples of effective active learning approaches in large classes at Duke.

Active Learning in Large Classes

Participants in this session explored several active learning techniques suitable for large classes, how to modify activities to successfully use them in large classes, creating an environment where students are comfortable participating in active learning activities, and looked at examples of effective active learning approaches in large classes at Duke.

Designing Long-Term Assignments

This session looked at how to successfully implement long-term, complex assignments in courses. Participants examined design considerations for long-term assignments, designed a scaffolded assignment that included a plan for formative feedback, and looked at how to facilitate students working on long-term assignments in groups.

Assessments, Grading and Rubrics

Faculty distinguished characteristics that make assessments effective, decided on appropriate formats for assessments, examined advantages and challenges of using rubrics, explored common issues with multiple choice questions, and learned how to design multiple choice questions that address higher order learning.

In the Fall and Spring, the Active Learning Fellows will conclude the program with a series of visits to their colleagues classrooms. Learning Innovation’s Visit a Classroom program is also open to any interested Duke faculty member.

Randy Riddle

Author: Randy Riddle

Randy Riddle is a Senior Consultant in Duke Learning Innovation and consults with faculty in the Social Sciences on pedagogy, learning, student assessment, and integrating technology into teaching practices. His professional interests include active learning, “flipped” classroom methods, inclusive classroom strategies, and integration of e-learning tools, social networking, video and multimedia, and data visualization into the daily work of teaching.