Planning student video assignments

As we approach the end of the semester, you’re probably thinking about your spring courses.  If you’re planning on having students complete a video based assignment in your course, or if you’re wondering if a student video assignment would help you reach some of your course learning goals, there are many resources at Duke for [...]

As we approach the end of the semester, you’re probably thinking about your spring courses.  If you’re planning on having students complete a video based assignment in your course, or if you’re wondering if a student video assignment would help you reach some of your course learning goals, there are many resources at Duke for you and your students to consider.

CIT consultants can provide help with planning the assignment, helping you think through the logistics of how the assignment will be completed and evaluated and things to consider about copyright, fair use, or student privacy.  The CIT Project Examples blog has information on how other Duke faculty are using video assignments in their courses if you would like to explore new ideas for your course or improve an existing course activity.

FlipsOIT’s training unit can provide you with custom training sessions for your students based on the tools they’ll be using for the assignment through their On-demand Training program.  Students can also get a refresher or explore other tools with OIT’s Online training.

For completing the assignment, students might use their own equipment, such as video capable mobile devices.  Or, if they need to check out a Flip camera or camcorder, the Link in Perkins Library can check out equipment to students and faculty for a period of four weeks.

The Multimedia Project Studio labs, located in the Bostock wing of Perkins Library on West Campus and Lilly Library on East Campus, have Mac workstations available where students can edit and format their projects for YouTube, DukeStream or other options and quiet rooms for recording audio.  Staff in the MPS can also provide help to your students as they work on video projects.

If you would like to discuss getting started with video in your courses, or for in-depth consulting on other teaching with technology topics, contact the CIT to speak with a consultant.

Randy Riddle

Author: Randy Riddle

Randy Riddle is a Senior Consultant in Duke Learning Innovation and consults with faculty in the Social Sciences on pedagogy, learning, student assessment, and integrating technology into teaching practices. His professional interests include active learning, “flipped” classroom methods, inclusive classroom strategies, and integration of e-learning tools, social networking, video and multimedia, and data visualization into the daily work of teaching.